Celebrate the flavors of Hanukkah with your baby

by

BabyCenter Guest Blogger

posted in Life & Home

By Cheryl Moellenbeck Tallman

Some people know Hanukkah as the Festival of Lights. They know about the candles lit to commemorate the miracle of the Hanukkah oil that lasted eight days, when it should have only lasted one day. What they might not know, is Hanukkah celebrates the rededication of the Holy Temple after it was reclaimed from the Syrian Greeks more than 21 centuries ago.

Fried food is also often associated with this holiday to celebrate the miracle of the Hanukkah oil. Jewish families will light the menorah each night in celebration, exchange gifts, play games and of course, eat! If your family celebrates Hanukkah, here are some ideas and recipes to help include your little one in the flavors of Hanukkah. Enjoy and happy Hanukkah!

About 6 Months

First food purees with a Hanukkah flavor:
• Broccoli
• Green Beans
• Applesauce

Hanukkah Applesauce Recipe
Hanukkah Recipes for Baby's First Hanukkah

Ingredients:
• 4 Golden Delicious or McIntosh Apples, peeled and cut into cubes
• 2 Tbsp. Butter
• 1/3 Cup of Water
• ¼ Cup of Sugar
• ¼ tsp. of Cinnamon

Directions:
Place the apples, butter, water and cinnamon into a pan. Cook on low heat for 25-35 minutes, until the apples become soft. Makes 3 cups.

About 7-12 Months

Latkes are a traditional food eaten during Hanukkah. For baby, try making this delicious Kohlrabi-Potato Puree. This puree is healthy and delicious. Just be sure to look for kohlrabi bulbs that are 21/2 inches in diameter at the market.

Hanukkah Kohlrabi-Potato Puree Recipe
Baby's First Hanukkah Recipes

Ingredients:
• 2 kohlrabi bulbs, with the leaves and stems removed – washed, peeled and cut into 1 inch chunks
• 2 medium russet potatoes, washed, peeled and cut into 1 inch chunks
• 6 medium button mushrooms, sliced
• ¼ cup of diced onion
• 1 Tbsp. of olive oil.
• A pinch of salt and pepper, to taste
• ½ cup of chicken or vegetable stock

Directions:
Add potatoes and kohlrabi chunks to a pot of boiling water, lightly salted. Reduce the heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes or until tender. While the potatoes and kohlrabi chunks are cooking, heat the olive oil in a skillet. Add the onions, mushrooms and the pinch of salt and pepper. Sauté over medium-low heat for 3-5 minutes or until softened. Remove from the heat.
Drain the potatoes and kohlrabi and puree. Add the mushrooms and onions to the food processor or blender and puree with the kohlrabi. Adding the soup stock to achieve a desired consistency.

Toddlers

Older babies who are enjoying finger foods and self-feeding, will love these potato pancakes, served with the Hanukkah Applesauce recipe (above)!
Hanukkah Potato Pancakes with Applesauce
Baby's First Hanukkah

Ingredients:
• 2 medium Russet potatoes – washed, peeled and grated
• 2-3 scallions, thinly sliced
• 1 egg
• 2 Tbsp. of flour
• 4 Tbsp. of vegetable oil
• Dash of nutmeg
• ¼ tsp of salt
• ¼ tsp of pepper

Directions:
In a medium sized bowl, mix the grated potatoes, beaten egg, thinly sliced scallions, flour, salt, pepper and nutmeg.
Pour oil onto a large frying pan. Heat the oil on medium heat. Use 1/3 cup of the potato mixture and drop onto the hot oil and flatten with the back of the spoon or spatula. Fry for 3 minutes on each side or until golden brown. Repeat until all of the mixture is used. Drain on paper towels to remove any oil.
Serve warm with applesauce.
Makes 8 potato pancakes.

CherylCheryl Moellenbeck Tallman is the Founder and CEO of Fresh Baby. Since Starting Fresh Baby in 2002, Cheryl Tallman has been honored with many prestigious awards, and is a U.S. Department of Agriculture National Nutrition Education Strategic Partner. As the head of product and content development for her company, Cheryl develops innovative products and authors materials that inspire parents to raise healthier children. She serves as both a parenting and cooking expert for many high-profile online communities. Follow Fresh Baby on Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest for more healthy eating tips and ideas.

This post was originally published in December, 2015